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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
, president obama will be among the mourners along with mrs. obama who met mandela shortly after becoming first lady. president bush and laura bush have been invited to travel with the obamas, and former president clinton and hillary clinton will travel to the tribute for nelson mandela. from south africa we hear from one of his friends who described those final visits with the man he revered. abc's byron pitts from outside mandela's home. >> reporter: nowhere has admiration for nelson mandela been stronger, expressed more passionately than a few feet from his doorstep outside his home where the beloved statesman took his last breath. >> by singing and dancing, it's a way of showing our appreciation. >> he represents this country. >> reporter: nelson mandela will be laid to rest in grand style. tuesday, a memorial service like the world has never seen. some 95,000 people packed inside the stadium. wednesday through friday the former president will lay in state in pretoria, the nation's legislative capital. next sunday mandela will be laid to rest in the small village of his boyhood on the
mandela with great fondness and great respect, but few knew him as well as bill clinton. joining us now, the former president of the united states, bill clinton. mr. president, thanks very much for sharing some thoughts on this special day. >> i'm glad to do it, wolf. >> what was it like the first time you met nelson mandela? >> well, i was excited. i felt almost like i was 20 years old again. it was at the democratic convention in new york. i was about to be nominated for president and former mayor david dinkins, a long-time supporter of mandela's, brought him up to our room where he met with hillary, chelsea and me. we hit it off right away. he was there really because he was an incredibly loyal person to anyone who supported him and the anc during his long imprisonment and democrats had supported sanctions on south africa so he wanted to be there, he wanted to be at our convention. he later came to the inauguration. and then hillary and vice president gore led a delegation to his inauguration in '94 and just five months later, he came to the united states on a state visit. that's whe
or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> reporter: as a senator obama had visited mandela, and the president and mrs. obama brought their doubters to robben island prison so they could better understand what mandela had suffered. after he died, michelle obama tweeted we will forever draw strength and inspiration from nelson mandela's extraordinary example of moral courage, kindness and humility. bill clinton tweeted a picture and wrote, "i will never forget my friend madibaa," use the affectionate name by which mandela was known to his followers. mandela wasn't always on the u.s. side. in the 1980s president reagan supported apartheid regime, and eastern as protests broke out an college campuses across america demanding the u.s. punish the regime. ♪ ♪ free mandela >> reporter: "free nelson mandela" became a popular anthem for black and white americans. finally, congress, including key republicans, overrode reagan's veto imposing the economic sanctions that helped break the apartheid regime. that set the stage for mandela's triumphant visit to washington as his country'
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)